The city of Miami, located in South Florida, has a strategic position on the map. You can find an amazing mixture of cultures that, combined with the sun and the sea, make this place vibrate in colorful, showy and joyful tunes.

There are many places in Miami where you can go and feel the Latin energy, understand much more about the history and, ultimately, have a great time in a city where there is always some Latin experiences (and many other things) to live! Bonus track: if you want to be reconnected with your Latin roots, Spanish language is a common currency here (as much as English).

Of course, being a big city, Miami offers different activities for all kinds of budgets. Since here at Cocina we like to combine amazing things together, here is a list for you that includes: great Latin places to visit + saving money. 

Top 5 Latin restaurants to go in Miami for less than $50

You can’t go sightseeing with an empty stomach, so let’s start with the best part for us: food, of course. 

1. Chifa Du Kang, a Chinese Peruvian Restaurant

Du Kang wants to share with their clients the fusion experienced by Peruvian culture with immigration, in this case Chinese. The Peruvians learned from the Chinese the secret of cooking over a high heat. This high heat has the power to turn the different ingredients inside a wok into a delicious dish, with unique flavors and the ability to fill a heart with happiness.

Get ready to enjoy the true taste of Chifa in Miami!

2. Mofongo Restaurant, a Puerto Rican treasure

Mofongo Restaurant was founded by the Colón brothers, who came from a Puerto Rican family who loved the traditional food of their native land. In this restaurant, they achieved the perfect union between tradition, quality and flavor! It’s a place where you can go relax, have some amazing Puerto Rican drinks and excellent dishes. 

3. CVI.CHE 105, specialized in Peruvian Ceviche!

Founded by the Peruvian chef Juan Chipoco, CVI.CHE 105 is an award-winning restaurant with many locations inside Miami City. Known for a wide selection of fresh and creative ceviches (in addition to other traditional Peruvian dishes) this restaurant has managed to reproduce the incredible flavors of Peru.

4. Marabú Restaurant, a tribute to Cuban food!

Marabú Restaurant, despite being located in Miami Downtown, offers an ambiance inspired by Cuban cities like Camagüey and Pinar del Rio. Therefore, its interiors embody the Cuban elegance that makes the island so alluring, with a Havana-inspired bar.

The restaurant’s artisanal cuisine brings Cuba’s countryside dishes to the table with bursts of smoky, rich flavor as they are cooked with charcoal. Likewise, the cuisine offers a variety of items on the menu ranging from large-format meats, rices, and vegetables as well as seafood.

5. Colombian restaurant that offers criolla food, called Bandeja Paisa

Bandeja Paisa is a restaurant specialized in Criolla food, founded first in Medellin by a Colombian family and then transported to Miami years later.

This restaurant has become the only Colombian restaurant that offers an extensive menu of dishes for all ages: from hot dogs, hamburgers, maicitos, quesadillas to traditional Colombian dishes such as bandeja paisa, soups, sancochos, grilled meats and much more.

Top 5 Latin places to visit in Miami for less than $20

Now that we have a full tummy, we’ll go for a stroll around the best Latin places in Miami. 

1. Go take a walk and have a drink at Little Havana

It’s not difficult to guess that this is a neighborhood where many Latin cultures coexist, but especially the Cuban (which is the one that has given the neighborhood its name).

Little Havana offers many fun things to do. Almost 50,000 people live in this neighborhood and it is full of restaurants, cafeterías, cigar stores, and record stores from where you hear salsa, merengue, cumbia, and cha cha chá coming out of the speakers.

The Máximo Gómez Park is located here, better known as the “Domino Park”. At this park, It’s common to see the locals sitting around several tables playing dominoes. If you dare, you can even learn to play it!

Little Haiti is also an option to visit. Although this is a much less touristy area than Little Havana, it is good to know that it also has many art galleries, Haitian music stores and bookstores, as well as a cultural center where they perform dance and theater sessions. It’s small and colorful, and worth your while! It’s recommended to visit Little Haiti during the day, because at night it could get a little shady if you don’t know around.

You can also go to the carnival that takes place on Calle 8! Although the tour of the caravans and costumes extends to just over twenty streets, the main event is on the Calle 8 of Little Havana. During the carnival, there are more than 400 food stalls from all Latin American countries and many artists performing in different stages at the same time.

This event is known for being the largest Hispanic festival in the country since 1970. This would be a good opportunity to dance, enjoy food and let yourself be carried away by traditions.Every year, the Calle 8 Carnival takes place during March. Stay tuned for the 2024 Carnival date release!

Little Havana offers many fun things to do. Almost 50,000 people live in this neighborhood and it is full of restaurants, cafeterías, cigar stores, and record stores from where you hear salsa, merengue, cumbia, and cha cha chá coming out of the speakers.

The Máximo Gómez Park is located here, better known as the “Domino Park”. At this park, It’s common to see the locals sitting around several tables playing dominoes. If you dare, you can even learn to play it!

Little Haiti is also an option to visit. Although this is a much less touristy area than Little Havana, it is good to know that it also has many art galleries, Haitian music stores and bookstores, as well as a cultural center where they perform dance and theater sessions. It’s small and colorful, and worth your while! It’s recommended to visit Little Haiti during the day, because at night it could get a little shady if you don’t know around.

You can also go to the carnival that takes place on Calle 8! Although the tour of the caravans and costumes extends to just over twenty streets, the main event is on the Calle 8 of Little Havana. During the carnival, there are more than 400 food stalls from all Latin American countries and many artists performing in different stages at the same time.

This event is known for being the largest Hispanic festival in the country since 1970. This would be a good opportunity to dance, enjoy food and let yourself be carried away by traditions.Every year, the Calle 8 Carnival takes place during March. Stay tuned for the 2024 Carnival date release!

2. Hit the best Latin nightclubs in Miami! 

The Latin clubs in Miami are the best to have fun on the weekend. Of course, the calor latino has been one of the main culprits for reputation since it is one of the US cities with the largest Hispanic population. There are almost 2 million Latino hearts that light up the streets of this vibrant city.

Miami is recognized for being, together with Ibiza in Spain, Mykonos in Greece and Ayia Napa in Cyprus, part of the “clubland”: a group formed by holiday destinations with the best discos, bars and clubs on the planet.

Some of the most famous Latin nightclubs in Miami to go dancing are: El Patio Wynwood, Ball & Chain, Lique Miami, El Tucan, Mango’s Tropical Café, La Covacha and Hoy Como Ayer. 

3. Go to an art exhibit at the Freedom Tower

If you want to add a bit of history to your city tour, then head towards #600 Biscayne Boulevard.

Once upon a time, the Freedom Tower was the tallest building in the city of Miami (hard to believe, right?). It was built in 1925 and at first it was the headquarters of a newspaper. By 1960, the first exiles from the Cuban community stayed there.

Today, the Freedom Tower is recognized as an historical place and you can visit and enjoy many art exhibitions here. Fun fact: its architectural design was inspired by the Giralda in Seville.

4. Visit the Pérez Art Museum

This museum is definitely a must see! People here care to interpret and study modern and contemporary art, highlighting the cultural diversity of Miami and how the Latino community develops and contributes to art in Miami.

The history of this museum dates back to 1984 and today it is an evolution of the Miami Museum of Art. Since this new location was built in Biscayne Bay, the museum authorities named it after the last name of its director, Jorge Pérez, due to all his dedication to art and respect between Latin cultures.

In addition to appreciating art and learning about different cultures, there are also beautiful spaces where you can walk around and take pictures. Super useful tip: the second Saturday of each month, admission is free!

5. Attend the famous gourmet gathering called SobeWWF

This is the largest food and wine festival in South Beach. Here is where the best Latin (and North American) food proposals come together so that everything is a delight on the palate.

More than 50,000 people attend this event every year, eager to experience the amazing Miami vibes and the flavors that go beyond a good guacamole and some nachos. In this event, the important thing is to uplift the gastronomy of each country.

Planning to go? Save the date for 2024: February 22 to 25!

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