Choripan

The Latin Versions of Hot Dogs and Burgers

by Alex Tabar

THIS POST IS SPONSORED BY MAZOLA©

Summer is here, and we are all getting ready for a great season! The weather is finally just right for outdoor activities like hiking or camping, a beach stroll or a pool day, and especially for taking out the grill and hosting barbecues and picnics.

If you’re planning your summer menu, there are two staples you can’t leave out: burgers and hot dogs. But this time, forget about traditional recipes and try these versions that some Latin American countries have adapted to their unique gastronomy. Putting a twist on these classic ideas, you’ll be sure to impress your guests at your next summer gathering.

 

Choripán — The Argentinian Hot Dog

Choripan

If you think Americans are proud of their hot dogs, you should hear Argentines boast about choripán at the southern end of the continent! Choripán is a sausage sandwich that you can find at parties, soccer games, and street food stalls.

Serving this chorizo sausage sandwich — accompanied by a chimichurri sauce — will draw the attention of many (especially those who love spicy flavors) the next time you organize a barbecue.

It’s very easy to prepare a choripán! Just put together a piece of rustic bread or baguette with grilled chorizo sausage and top with chimichurri sauce.

Prepare a delicious chimichurri sauce by merely mixing chopped garlic, parsley, oregano, red peppers, corn oil, and your favorite vinegar.

 

The Chilean Burger with Pebre

What makes the Chilean burger different from the rest is the touch of the pebre sauce. A condiment that Chileans use in many of their dishes — although it varies by region — pebre is basically a mixture of cilantro, garlic, onion, corn oil, and ground aji chili peppers.

Some people say that pebre is the Chilean equivalent of pico de gallo for Mexicans, chimichurri for Argentines, or wasakaka for Dominicans.

To prepare these Chilean burgers, make the beef patties by mixing the meat with onion, cumin, garlic, salt, pepper, oregano, Worcestershire sauce, and one egg. Let them cook on a griddle with a little corn oil while you prepare the Pebre.

To assemble the burger, place the meat on Marraqueta bread or any other hamburger bun and add mashed avocado, a slice of tomato, pebre sauce and a sprinkle of pumpkin seeds.

 

Mixtas and Shucos — Two Guatemalan Hot Dogs

Guatemalans like their hot dogs so much that they have not one, but two traditional versions!

Mixtas are hot dogs wrapped in a corn tortilla instead of bread. You can prepare this recipe easily by cutting the sausages in half and pan-frying them in corn oil. Place a dollop of mayonnaise and mustard on the tortilla, and then add some guacamole seasoned with salt and lemon. Finally, layer on the sausages, a little cabbage, top with some ketchup, and voilá! Enjoy!

The other version of Guatemalan hot dogs are called shucos. These are popular at street food stalls in Guatemala and are preferred by meat lovers. You’ll see why!

In addition to the toasted bun, these Latin hot dogs stand out because they are traditionally topped with a mixture of other meats like chorizo, sausage, salami, and even bacon.

This meaty sausage sandwich is normally prepared with some mayo, ketchup, mustard, sauerkraut, and guacamole. Some people also like adding tomatoes and a sprinkle of hot sauce.

The Dominican Chimi Burger

This traditional recipe consists of a beef patty topped with a mix of onions, garlic, soy sauce, and oregano. After grilling the meat, layer it with the topping mixture on a traditional Dominican bread similar to a baguette called “pan de agua.” In places where you can’t find this type of bread, the chimi can be served on a burger bun.

Preparing a chimi is very easy, but there are two essential elements that you cannot skip: Chimis are always dressed with a Dominican pink special sauce (a mixture of ketchup and mayonnaise) and a handful of cabbage sautéedwith corn oil, salt and pepper. To round it out, some people also add onions and tomatoes, while others prefer melted cheese and hot sauce.

Serve with a cold beer on the side!

 

Venezuelan Hot Dogs

What defines the Venezuelan version of the hot dog is one special topping: potato sticks! If you can’t find these sticks, crushed potato chips will do the job and will add some crunch to the sandwich.

Prepare the sausages in your favorite style either boiled or grilled and assemble on the bun with green cabbage, shredded carrots, avocado sauce, and cheese. Top with the potato sticks or chips and drizzle some ketchup, mayo, and mustard on top.

The Latin Versions of Hot Dogs and Burgers | Cocina
Blog, Hero, Sponsored – Mazola


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